[IEbook] PDF Download Emotiile distructive. Cum le putem depasi? Dialog stiintific cu Dalai Lama. Editia a II-a, by Daniel Goleman. [MEbook] PDF Download Emotiile distructive. Cum le putem depasi? Dialog stiintific cu Dalai Lama. Editia a II-a, by Daniel Goleman. Destructive Emotions has ratings and reviews. Unfortunately, Daniel Goleman rather gets in the way of the “dialogue” to which the title refers.

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So, How you people can read this book till the end? Wouter Pinkhof Because they focus: Hey guys, could anyone tell me about how to start reading this book.

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As i do not see icon about “start dabiel Mickaugrec I suggest you fan the pages and see what catches your glance. Distrjctive repeat holding upside down and flipping the pages in reverse, in case you missed …more I suggest you fan the pages and see what catches your glance. Then repeat holding upside down and flipping the pages in reverse, in case you missed anything.

Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. The title of this book, “Focus”, surely must be ironic.

It’s not just unfocused, it’s so unfocused that I’m not really sure what it’s supposed to be about and yes, I did read the entire thing. It’s as if the author just tried to jumble together all the things he’s interested in – global warming, empathy, Daniel Kahneman-esque behavioral theory, business management, etc.

The problem is there’s no theme that really ties distructkve together.

I mean, obviously the theme is supposed to be focus he The title of this book, “Focus”, surely must be ironic. I mean, obviously the theme is supposed to be focus hence the titlebut it really seems like a bunch of moderately-interesting facts collected together with no context in a book with no real purpose.

And the facts themselves aren’t anything new or exciting. If you’ve read Daniel Kahneman or Malcolm Gladwell or any pop-psych book, you won’t find anything you haven’t read a million times before. View all 22 comments.

This book is all about how we Some interesting facts about Apple’s business strategy! I bought this book because I need help focusing, and I have a lot of respect for Daniel Goleman’s important work on emotional intelligence.

I finished it a little bit disappointed, feeling like I knew some interesting facts about how focus works and can work, but without much in the way of useful information about how to increase my own focus.

I already knew that mindfulness is a good and valuable skill to train. I already knew that certain video games targeted at brain functions could train the I bought this book because I need help focusing, and I have a lot of respect for Daniel Goleman’s important work on emotional intelligence.

I already knew that certain video games targeted at brain functions could train the brain in good ways rather than bad–I’ve used Lumosity, an online arcade of “good” video games since with mixed results. And I needed a couple of days to recover from Goleman’s report of the shocking “Dunedin Study” which basically showed that without willpower, there is a very good scientific chance a person is screwed for life–poverty and depression at best, criminality at worst.

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Destructive Emotions: A Scientific Dialogue with the Dalai Lama by Daniel Goleman

Definitely plausible, but very hard to swallow as a person who has struggled with willpower for thirty years. But perhaps that’s unfair–perhaps I came to it with too much expectation that it would provide me with neatly-packaged self-help platitudes and programs.

And some of it is indeed really interesting. The analysis of “top-down” vs. Although it’s also covered in slightly different terminology in Charles Duhigg’s “The Power of Habit”. Also good–though like Dunedin, also worrisome to anyone who’s not a superstar at something–is his discussion of how the value of practice is largely negated if the practicer is daydreaming or doing whatever it is imperfectly.

Finally, there is the funny meta-problem that a reviewer on Amazon rightly pointed out, that the book itself is somewhat unfocused. It seems to roughly follow a “small to large” progression, starting with the inside-the-brain processes, and ostensibly “zooming eemotiile to look at how focus works on larger scales like person-to-person, then analyzing large data systems, and so on.

But the transitions between sections are far from smooth or intuitive, and there were a couple of times when I wondered if I was still reading the same book. Then again, maybe I daniep focusing. And while this isn’t an issue for me, Goleman concludes on a slightly political note by arguing that the highest form of focus humankind could muster right now is to stop doing things like harming the planet and increasing the wealth gap.

These may indeed be very important to danniel with, but it seems incongruous with a totally even-handed look at “The Hidden Driver of Excellence”. View all 4 comments. Feb 16, K. Turning off our smartphones once in a while. Giving our full attention when someone is talking to us. Letting the other person complete her sentence and not finishing it for her. Asking questions to show interest.

Look her in the eyes. Focus on what’s more important.

I thought I knew all of these or maybe I used to know but somehow lost them. So, I picked up this book one Sunday afternoon from Fullybooked The Block while waiting for my wife and daughter to arri Turning off our smartphones once in a while. So, I picked up this book one Sunday afternoon from Fullybooked The Block while waiting for my wife and daughter to arrive. It is always nice to read a non-fiction book for self-development.

Non-fiction can remind oneself that there is a real world out there. That in that world, we need to work. And it working, we need to deal with people. And dealing with people can be challenging because they are different with each other.

Non-fiction can also remind ourselves that there is no end to improve ourselves no matter how educated, old or experienced we already are. The Hidden Driver of Excellence is not just a reminder of the things I used to know or at least heard before.

It is written by a former science journalist of the New York Times. The first chapter is very interesting as it incorporates science research distfuctive how some people can “read” minds by looking distructiive facial expressions. Every twitch of facial muscles, how mouth opens, how jaw drops, how those eyes sparkle and how those brows raise. There is a science to this. What struck me most is that due to the overuse of cellphones, he says that millennials young people of today have the difficulty of reading facial expressions.

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They grew up playing videos and their use of smartphones is greater than having to interact with real people. I’d like to share with you some quotes whose pages I dogeared: That takes self-awareness and empathy in a self-reinforcing cycle. You become more aware of how you’re coming across to other people.

With high self-awareness, you can more readily develop good self-management. If you manage yourself better, you will influence better. Strategy was how you deployed your gokeman tactics were how battles were fought. Today, leaders need to generate strategies that make sense in goelman larger systems they operate in – a task for outer focus.

So, please do yourself a favor. If you want to make yourself better in focusing as it it a hidden driver of excellenceplease read this book! Danieel all 6 comments. Daniel Goleman returned to Berkeley not long ago to speak to a large and enthusiastic audience at International House about the themes in his new book, Focus.

You may remember Goleman as the a Daniel Goleman returned to Berkeley not long ago to speak to a large and enthusiastic audience at International House about the themes in his new book, Focus. You may remember Goleman as the author of the dsniel bestseller, Emotional Intelligence, which taught us all that psychological factors other than IQ were better predictors of success dahiel the job and in life.

Goleman was trained as a psychologist but soon after his post-doctoral studies turned his hand to science journalism, writing about new developments in brain science and related topics for The New York Times for a dozen years and later turning to writing independently. Over the years, he has shifted back and forth from teaching and research to science writing and back again.

To date, he has produced ten books. Focus is the most recent.

I vividly remember devouring Emotional Intelligence much as I would a compelling murder mystery. The book was a revelation. Focus falls far short of it. The extraordinary improvement in school performance brought about by exercises in mindfulness was startling news.

And the application of similar training methods in various aspects of emotional intelligence yielded similarly impressive results in the workplace, boosting job performance, job satisfaction, and workforce morale. I just wish Goleman had found a way to report it in a more accessible and congenial way.

View all 3 comments. If you are poor, you depend on good relationships with friends and family whom you may distructige to turn to for help–say, when you need someone to look after your four-year-old until you get home from work. Those with few resources and a fragile perch on stability “need to lean on people,” says Dacher Keltner, a psychologist at the University of California, Berkeley. This means, Keltner argues, that rich people can afford dsitructive be less aware of the needs of other people, and so can be less attentive to them and their suffering.

The golemn wealthy at least among American college students exhibit fewer signs of engagement like making eye contact, nods, and laughing–and more of those for daniwl, like checking the time, doodling, or fidgeting.